Could Lipitor-Induced Diabetes Increase the Risk of Dementia?

The fact that lipitor causes diabetes in women has been widely documented. Sadly, far too many unsuspecting women who took Lipitor to manage their cholesterol, were later diagnosed with diabetes. The manufacturers of Lipitor are facing litigation over the matter, and some patients who contracted the condition may receive compensation for their pain and suffering.

The American Diabetic Association estimates that nearly a quarter of a million deaths every year are attributable in whole or in part to diabetes. Some of those patients may have contracted diabetes after taking Lipitor. Unfortunately, based on results of a new study by researchers from the University of California San Fransisco and the National Institute of Aging, those estimates may be too low.

After analyzing the health statistics of 783 elderly patients over the course of 12 years, these scientists concluded that for diabetics with hypoglycemic episodes severe enough to warrant hospitalization, risk of later being diagnosed with a dementia-related condition doubled. Study authors note the following:

“The study results suggest some patients risk entering a downward spiral in which hypoglycemia and cognitive impairment fuel one another, leading to worse health, said Kristine Yaffe, MD, senior author and principal investigator for the study.”

In other words, it is possible that elderly women with Lipitor-induced or exacerbated diabetes may be especially vulnerable to worsening health down the road. For example, consider a hypothetical case where an otherwise healthy woman takes Lipitor to manage her cholesterol. She then contracts diabetes, and is hospitalized after a severe incident of hypoglycemia. She later develops dementia, becomes forgetful, and neglects to take her medicine. The medication non-compliance then leads to another hospitalization. And the cycle continues.

If you or your loved one have taken Lipitor and contracted diabetes, it is important contact us.